Senior Soccer Banners for Your Team

Many consider soccer as one of the most popular sports in the world. As such, it has become like one of the most-favored recreational activities for many. Those who enjoy the game would also show their enthusiasm whenever they are watching or playing soccer. Fans gather round their respective team grounds to cheer the players with chants and songs. No soccer game is complete without each team and their fans wearing their team colors or anything that will represent the team that they are supporting, including a soccer banners.

soccer banners

Watching both the players and the fans will send chills that are quite electrifying and will make one want to jump in place. That is most specially whenever the team that they are showing their support is winning. Fans want nothing more than to see their team scoring and winning in the end. The atmosphere within the vicinity will always be intense, and it will be rare that no one will end up getting hurt as some of those watching would be offended at times by the competing team’s fans.

If you want some action and are tired of the boring routine, take some time off and watch one competition that may be available to watch on TV. Even it is a different kind of sports, as long as it is a team sport, there will definitely be no boring moments while the game is on.

Showing Support To Your Team With A Soccer Banner

A more civilized manner of showing support to your team is by using a soccer banner to announce to the rest of the world your respect and enthusiasm for your team.

Banners come in various sizes, shapes, and designs. These banners normally carry the team’s logo and, at times, even the names of the members of the team. Some prefer to show off the face of their favorite player. It really depends on the audience’s mood and perspectives. But it would really be more motivating for the team if the banner bears only the logo of the team to show support to the whole team and not just to a single member of the team.

There are different types of these banners, such as the changing roll ups (a.k.a. the spectaculars), the table top banners, the carrying types (i.e. flags), backdrop banners, as well as podium banners.

Whatever type of and however the banners are designed does not really matter. Showing any of these banners is enough to make enliven the spirit of both the audience and the players in a soccer competition.Read more

Eugene Summer Solstice, 2015 Edition

BERKELEY, California — After a month or tryouts and a couple practice weekends and a team retreat, we were more than amped to play in our first tournament of the season. Since the tournament was in Eugene, OR, a few of us flew to Portland and drove down, while the other half of the team road-tripped up. We all arrived at Malina Wiebe’s parents’ house by 11pm and got settled in as we had an early start and a full schedule of games to be played. Full schedule and results here: Eugene Summer Solstice #37
Saturday morning, everyone woke up extra cheery and excited for the day ahead. After a quick breakfast at the Wiebe’s house, we drove to the fields and cleated up in preparation for our first game of the season. It seemed like “Cheerleader” was played on repeat 7,000x, but then it was game time!

On the day, three (Ivy, Grind, Elevate) of the four (+U-23 Team USA) teams that we played were first-year teams that were athletic and chock-full of potential—it will be exciting to see how they develop in the coming years. We opened the day with a spirited game against Ivy (Portland, OR) and, despite the score, were challenged from start to finish. Next up was Grind (Seattle, WA), a team that was small in number, but mighty in fight. During the third round, we had a bye, so we hung out with our friends, took lots of
selfies, and cheered on Marisa Rafter and the rest of the U-23 Team USA (everywhere USA).

Some might say that all of the teams that we played on day 1 were first-year teams because the U-23 Team USA was also playing its first tournament together in preparation for Worlds in July. Playing the U-23ers was a matchup that we were looking forward to though we were not as stoked about the outcome. It was exciting that the U-23 team was coming together so quickly, but it was also a little frustrating on our end as we had suddenly developed a case of the drops. Anyway, it was a hard fought game and one that we took a lot away from.

To round out the day, we matched up again Elevate (Salt Lake City, UT) and it was a nice way to end the day. Elevate’s athleticism and good throws definitely pushed us to make cleaner cuts and better decisions. To finish the day, Teresa Feng was presented with the spirit award—a tasty shot of contraband vodka from Utah—which ended up being water.

The showcase game between the U-23 Team USA and the U-23 Team Canada was at a different field site, so we rushed over there after the games to cheer on Oosa and grab a bite to eat. Some were successful in getting the tournament food and some were successful in going to the beer garden. In all, it was a nice way to end the game.Read more

U.S. Open Preview

BLUE ASH, Ohio — With the U.S. Open fast approaching, we thought it might be fun to do a tournament preview. We’re already in Ohio and we’ll be heading to West Chester bright and early for our first round of games. These thoughts are our own—read them in a playful tone and proceed to learn all of our secrets for the weekend. #upandupandup

This is Nightlock’s first season in the Pro Flight and it’s our first opportunity to consistently test itself against the nation’s top teams. An added benefit of opting-in to the U.S. Open means that we get to test ourselves against some of the world’s best teams as well. For most of us, this will be our first exposure to some of these teams and their markedly different styles of play.

Since the tournament has 12 teams per division, the schedule is a little janky. To start the tournament, Nightlock is seeded 8th overall, and 4th in Pool B. Fellow Pool B teams are Fury (San Francisco, CA), Riot (Seattle, WA), Ozone (Atlanta, GA), Schwa (Portland, OR), and Phoenix (Raleigh, NC)

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Help Malafama become the first Mexican team to play in a United States tournament!

BERKELEY, California — Malafama Ultimate Club wants to become the first Mexican team to play in in a United States tournament AND they plan to make that tournament USA Ultimate’s Texas Sectional in September. Currently, they’re doing an Indiegogo campaign to raise money and offset their travel expenses. For those of you who don’t know, Malafama is the #1 Women’s Division team in Mexico.

Last November, a few Nightlockers had the privilege of playing with some of these wonderful and amazing women at a tournament called Ulticopa (watch the video above and see if you recognize any familiar faces). While the video is of Mexico’s #1 Mixed Division team, Slash, most of the women are also on Malafama.

We think this is an incredible opportunity to support international women’s ultimate and help the sport grow. While you probably have never heard of any of the women on Malafama, you might recognize them in their Slash jerseys from the World Ultimate Club Championships last summer in Lecco, Italy, where they took home the Spirit Award. The Spirit Award was a large step in the right direction for Mexican Ultimate as a whole as it brought attention to their country and their amazing community.

Now, Malafama wants to be a trailblazer for Mexican ultimate and play in USAU Sectionals. I bet the Texas teams that play Malafama will be in awe of the skill and athleticism of these women. For example, Ana Paula is a tall, fast cutter that the Mexicans call, “Mexican Beau Kittredge.” Also, most of the Mexican handlers will break your mark, then streak upfield before you even realize what happened. Anyway, Malafama will bring their A-game to Sectionals, so Texas should be prepared. Regardless of the outcome of Sectionals, Malafama will be able to go back to Mexico with pride.